Dec 30, 2010

What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Ten: Alcohol

This final installment brings you the good, the bad, and the ugly in consuming alcohol. Add, "What you drink” to your 2011 New Year’s Resolution list.

As we conclude 2010 and begin a new year, alcohol is usually part of the celebration. But before you pop that cork and "party on," let's stop and briefly take a look at the good, the bad, and the ugly surrounding this beverage.

The Ugly:
Even though this is not the focus of our beverage expedition, the dark side of alcohol should be noted. Other than that nasty hangover after a night of drunkenness, this beverage choice causes poor judgment, behavioral problems, and for millions it leads to alcohol abuse, and even death. Sadly, MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving), who "serves a victim or survivor of drunk driving every 10 minutes," statistics are grim: "every minute, one person is injured from an alcohol-related crash." And alarmingly, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reported that "10,839 people were killed in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes in 2009 –– that's one every 50 minutes."

The Bad:
As far as the fitness aspects, you should be aware that alcohol has short-term effects on health and body fat; its nutritional value is nil –– as in tons of empty calories, and those mixed drinks pack on more calories than you think. Drinking a lot of booze can also cause dehydration, create electrolyte imbalances, and alcohol can indirectly make you fat –– "while your body uses up all the alcohol circulating in the blood, the oxidation of fats, carbohydrates and protein becomes suppressed." Translation: these macronutrients are not used for their intended purpose and are "forced into storage."

The Good:
Now, you may not be a heavy drinker, which is a good thing, but perhaps you are under the impression that "moderate drinking –– about one drink a day for women, about two for men –– is a central component of a healthy lifestyle." Are you are convinced by what some "experts" have been touting for years? That alcohol is good for your health –– reduces risk of heart disease, diabetes and dementia –– mainly. Not so fast my friends because the New York Times shed "doubt" on the case in 2009; highlighting that some scientists take issue with these claims, and in reality "it may be that moderate drinking is just something healthy people tend to do, not something that makes people healthy." Furthermore, the Mayo Clinic, who lists some of the health benefits of moderate drinking, also points out that "the evidence about the possible health benefits of alcohol isn't certain, and alcohol may not benefit everyone who drinks."

Yes, you may snag some antioxidants and a "sense of relaxation" from that red wine, but then again, it's possible to benefit more from a glass of grape juice, a massage, and soothing music. Keep in mind too, that 1 glass (3.5 fl oz) of wine is 85 calories and if you consume a glass a day; that adds up to 595 calories per week. Beer on the other hand, ranges from 95 to over 200 calories, while cocktails can top 700 calories for just one. And for those "watching their weight," calories do count.

RECAP:

Before we complete our beverage journey, let's recap. First and foremost, water is essential to life and critical for health, wellness, and weight loss. Coffee is good in moderation if you skip the cream and sugar and tea (without the sugar) offers countless health and wellness benefits, while green tea helps fight obesity and lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Milk is highly overrated. Consuming too much soda has dire consequences to your overall health and fitness level. Some sports drinks as well as fruit and vegetable juices can be a good way to hydrate and catch a few vitamins and minerals while you're at it; however, sugar and other additives may be in the mix too. Meal replacement drinks have their place in our fast-paced society, providing you read labels or make your own. Lastly, good news for our beloved abstainers, if you are serious about losing fat, alcohol must be off limits. However, alcohol (in moderation; as in a few a week, not a day) can be a beverage choice when you are on a maintenance plan.


In closing, it's important to understand that "what you drink does impact your diet" –– good and bad –– when it comes to overall health and weight loss. An occasional detour from healthy and fit beverage choices will not harm your efforts, but staying on the wrong path for a long period of time will.

Add this to your 2011 New Year's Resolution list: "I will drink more water and clean up my other beverage choices." Place it on your frig and other places as a reminder and motivator. I guarantee you will feel and look much better.

May you have a safe, healthy, and prosperous New Year!

Article first published as What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Ten: Alcohol on Blogcritics.
Author: Christine Lakatos — Published: Dec 29, 2010 at 12:29 pm

Dec 22, 2010

What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Nine: Meal Replacement Drinks

Beware: Just like meal replacement bars, meal replacement drinks are used to entice the consumer, via quick-fix scams and false promises.

In closing Part Eight, we discovered that veggie drinks are an excellent meal replacement choice, providing you choose appropriately or build your own. However, veggie drinks are not the only way to get health-on-the-go; we are saturated with hundreds of diet and protein shake options. Unfortunately, the billion-dollar fitness industry makes its money off quick-fix scams and false promises. Beware: just like meal replacement bars, meal replacement drinks are used to entice the consumer, using the aforementioned techniques.

Next time you pick up a so-called “diet or protein shake" or vegetable drink, make sure you carefully examine the ingredients. This is because, like most commercial beverages, many of these pre-made drinks contain a lot of sugar and other sweeteners, fat, and an array of preservatives and additives. In many diet and protein shakes, the "protein blend" used is questionable, as are the claims touted in their advertising and on their labels.

For example, let's take a peek at Slim-Fast diet shakes, with over 50 ingredients—the third of which happens to be sugar. While one can of this drink is low in calories (180), it still contains 23 grams of carbs, of which 18 grams comes from sugar. The number one ingredient is fat-free milk (a liquid choice covered in Part Five)—not necessarily bad, except for those who are lactose intolerant. But considering that it is not organic milk, it's a red flag for those of us who care about cows. Even though they have thrown in some vitamins and minerals, enhancing its nutritional value, you only get 10 grams of protein out of the Slim-Fast can, yet you'll consume 6 grams of fat (1.5 grams saturated), which, at the end of the day, may not be worth it.

After a brief analysis of the nutrition label, the next step is to dig deeper into the ingredients. For the sake of time, we'll just probe into the protein blend (the sixth ingredient) used in Slim-Fast. It is
Milk Protein Concentrate (known as MPC), a commonly used additive in products like processed cheese (Kraft singles), coffee creamers, frozen dairy desserts, crackers, energy bars, and nutritional drinks. MPC's "are created when milk is ultra-filtered, a process that drains out the lactose and keeps the milk protein and other large molecules. The protein components are then dried and become a powder."

Apparently, in 2009, the dairy industry was (is) suffering a "crisis" which is neither my concern nor the focus of our "expedition." According to Ethecurian online magazine, this dairy crisis is not just a result of the recession; it also has to do with MPC. For the most part, MPC is imported, and from countries "with very poor food safety records (China, India, Poland, the Ukraine)." Moreover, ironically MPC is an ingredient "used to make glue" and is not approved by the FDA, yet "it somehow manages to be included in the ingredient list of over $10 billion worth of food, primarily fast food and junk food."

So, Slim-Fast may be "fast," but will it make you slim? Only in your head, because in reality, the bad outweighs the good it offers. Now, we could spend hours dissecting all of the bad pre-made meal replacement drinks on the market, but that would be a waste of time. More important is to become skilled in reading labels—setting you free to make "good" choices all of the time.

While we addressed green drinks at out last stop, protein shakes and smoothies (the good ones) usually start with water, ice, real juice, organic milk, soymilk, sugar-free yogurt, frozen yogurt, and/or fresh fruit. Additionally, protein powders are sometimes included in the mix. Most commonly used are whey, casein, egg, soy, and rice, or a combination—each carrying their own "pros and cons." According to Web MD, "protein is one of the body's main building blocks for muscle, bone, skin, and other tissues" and is essential to your daily diet for overall health and wellness. It is critical for athletes' endurance and strength, as well as for fitness enthusiasts and for those seeking to lose weight. This leads to a commonly asked question: how much protein?

Most nutritionists and those in the medical profession "recommend daily intake of protein for healthy adults [of] 0.75 g of protein per kilogram of body weight, or about 45 to 56 g of protein a day, while exercisers' range should be 1.4 to 2 g of protein per kilogram of body weight daily." For those trying to gain weight or increase lean body mass, you may consider siding with the higher figure, and it is better to "feed the muscle"—around 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass.

Fortunately, most of us can obtain enough protein via our daily diet; meal replacement drinks could be your guarantee. Protein shakes and smoothies also offer an avenue for other "nutrients on the run" and a vehicle for providing energy throughout the day, especially if they are of superior quality. They are much better solutions than skipping a meal or resorting to fast food or junk food.

What about meal replacement drinks for weight loss? Mayo Clinic nutritionist Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. reminds us that "protein shakes aren't a magic bullet"—there is none—but they may help you reduce your caloric intake, and as we know, "burning more calories than you consume is key to losing weight." That said, a balanced diet of natural, whole foods (not processed, man-made foods)—lean protein (animal and plant-based sources), fruits and vegetables, whole grains as well as foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids (fish and plants)—is ideal for all health and fitness goals.

Therefore if you are considering a pre-made protein shake or smoothie, either in a can (not ideal) or at your local fitness center or juice bar like Jamba Juice, make sure you know what is in it—ask questions. Or construct your own using pure and wholesome ingredients. Here are two ideas to get you started:

Power Protein Shake (makes one)

Ingredients:

2 scoops of quality protein powder (Living Fuel Living Protein is one of the purest on the market, and they produce a number of other sound products like Living Fuel Super Greens)
1/4 cup plain low-fat yogurt
1/2 banana
1/4 cup mixed berries (fresh)
1/4 cup water (or juice, but it will add more calories)

Preparation: Combine first 4 ingredients in a blender or Magic Bullet, add water and mix until well blended.
Nutritional Value: 334.5 calories; 24 g protein; 58 g carbs; 1.6 g fat; 10 g fiber; 170 mg sodium
Note: If you want to add more value to your shake, try 1 Tbsp. of flaxseeds: 48 calories; 2 g protein; 3.3 g carbs; 3.3 g fat; 2.7 g fiber; 3.4 mg sodium.

High-Fiber Vegan Smoothie (makes one)

Ingredients:

1 cup strawberries (fresh or frozen)
1 cup mixed berries (fresh or frozen)
1/2 cup soymilk
Ice if you are not using frozen (additive-free) fruit.

Preparation: Mix all ingredients in a blender until smooth.
Nutritional Value: 175 calories; 5.4 g protein; 35.5 g carbs; 2.6 g fat; 13.4 g fiber; 61.4 mg sodium

Drink to (for) your health, and "I'll be back" for the final installment of our beverage journey. Oddly enough, we are in the middle of the Holiday Season, where "'Tis the Season to be jolly"—marking our last STOP fitting: alcohol, the good, the bad, and the ugly. Nevertheless, I won't be a "party pooper" until after Christmas. In the meantime, "drink responsibly," and Merry Christmas!


Article first published as What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Nine: Meal Replacement Drinks on Blogcritics. Author: Christine LakatosPublished: Dec 21, 2010 at 1:19 pm @ MY DIVA DIET: Fitness Flash


Dec 14, 2010

What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Eight: Juice (Fruit and Vegetable)

"Should I have a V8" or any commercial fruit juice or veggie drink? It all depends.

Considering that fruits and vegetables are high in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other nutrients and should be a large part of any sound diet –– for weight loss and protecting health, consuming juice (fruit and vegetable) seems like a "no-brainer." However, most "commercial juices" are high in calories and low in fiber –– the opposite of fruits and vegetables in their natural complete states. Worse, these beverages are high in sugar and contain very little of the fruit or vegetable they are supposedly derived from, which means that their nutritional value and purpose is suspect.

The naturally occurring sugar (fructose) found in fruit and some vegetables like carrots and beets is not at issue (excluding diabetics and those sensitive to sugar); it's the extra refined sugars, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as well as the preservatives and additives –– ingredients used in most commercial juice and vegetable drink recipes. And have you been down the juice aisle lately? Companies are making juice out of "everything but the kitchen sink." Consequently, at this juncture in our beverage expedition, we'll just analyze a few to make a larger point.

Let's take for example the kid-pushed Capri Sun drink, which was labeled as "All Natural" when the ingredients were (are) water, high-fructose corn syrup, small amount of juice, and flavoring natural –– an additive best avoided. That was until a lawsuit erupted in 2007, forcing them to rethink and withdraw their "All Natural" claim. Since, Capri Sun has undergone a makeover, embracing drinks without high-fructose corn syrup, but they still use refined sugar and other additives. To confuse the issue, Capri Sun, owned by Kraft Foods, marketing strategy touts "25% less sugar" (6-ounce pouch equals 60 calories and 16 grams of sugar) and a deceptive slogan of "wholesome."

On the other hand, in an 8-ounce cup of Minute Maid orange juice (Home Squeezed Style + Calcium and Vitamin D), the ingredient list is much purer (NO added sugar and the like); still you'll drink 110 calories and 24 grams of sugar. Furthermore, even though there is no fat and a minimal amount of sodium in Minute Maid beverages, they do lack the fiber found in fresh fruit, which is vital for a healthy diet and helps with fat loss. In contrast, a large orange has the advantage of 4.4 grams of fiber. The same can be said for apple juice –– and most commercial fruit juice for that matter. For the same amount of calories (around 100) you get 5 grams of fiber with a large apple vs. zero in a cup of apple juice.

Commercial vegetable drinks (juices) are a little trickier to decipher, and there are decent choices on the market these days. Even though veggie drinks do contain vegetables, many add fruit, sugar, and additives to make it more palatable as well as preservatives to extend shelf life. Some like Bolthouse Farms contain Spirulina (a blue-green algae, offering "nutrients, amino acids, and health benefits," yet not without its "skeptics and cautions to consider") to their Green Goodness –– AKA "green drink."

This brings us to the familiar V8 veggie drink, invented back in the 1930's by W.G. Peacock, and acquired by Campbell Soup Company in 1948. Over the years, it became popular with its infamous marketing line, "I could've had a V8" –– still used today, even popping up on an episode of Family Guy. V8 has evolved, adding many other so-called healthy beverages to their product line. While some of the V8 fruit juice blends contain high-fructose corn syrup, their 100% Vegetable Juice is not bad –– it's low in calories (50 for 8 oz.), yet high in sodium (420 mg in 8oz.). Maybe that is why they developed a low-sodium version with 140 mg.

So, when it comes to health and fitness, the real question must be preemptive and without the "regret head bang" –– "Should I have a V8" or any commercial fruit juice or veggie drink? It all depends. Read labels; skip the ones with added sugar and sugar derivatives like HFCS, too much sodium, and carefully analyze preservatives and additives. Try to choose fruit and veggie drinks that are freshly made or better yet, "juice it" yourself. Here is a quick and simple veggie drink recipe: Take 1 beet, 2 carrots, and 1 cup broccoli, blend in your Jack Lalanne's Power Juicer, and enjoy! Nutritional Value: 200 calories, 8.8 grams protein, 39.6 grams carbs, 0.8 grams fat; 12 grams fiber, and 220 mg (natural) sodium.

While natural and fresh juice, for the most part, serves as a thirst quencher or a beverage with a meal, they are also an immense aid when you are sick or fasting for health or spiritual reasons. But for those counting calories, beware, juice calories add up quickly. Even so, veggie drinks are a positive alternative to "fast food," an avenue for those lacking vegetables in their diet, an awesome way to boost nutrient intake, and a substitute for any meal of the day –– only if you choose the right one or make your own. And for those eager for more "meal replacement" ideas (protein shakes, smoothies, and green drinks), stay tuned –– it's our next STOP in our journey toward health, wellness and a fit physique.

Article first published as What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Eight: Juice (Fruit and Vegetable) on Blogcritics. Author: Christine Lakatos — Published: Dec 13, 2010 at 2:04 pm / Part of Fitness Flash and My Diva Diet blog spot!
This is Part Eight of Weight Loss: What You Drink Impacts Your Diet 10-Part Series
This ten-part series, a "beverage expedition" of sorts, will uncover how liquid consumption affects your weight, health and wellness, for better or worse.

Dec 8, 2010

"World of Diets" Interviews Me!


A while ago, World of Diets interviewed me and recently it has been posted. World of Diets is not only a great place for "terrific interviews" from fitness experts as wells as diet reviews, but also has an array of articles ranging from diet, health, foods, exercise, fitness equipment and so much more...
"Choosing the right diet plan is probably the most important factor in determining whether or not you will lose weight and be able to keep it off for many years to come.

Here on WorldofDiets.com, we provide hundreds of diet reviews, interviews with fitness and fat loss experts and a variety of articles and tips about how to eat right, burn body fat off quickly, and be healthy. Check out a variety of our reviews and posts at WorldofDiets.com."
EXCERPT From my interview with Jonathan:

Question: I’m here today with Christine Lakatos, the author of the popular My Diva Diet. Thanks for taking the time for this interview, Christine. What can you tell us about your background and qualifications in the fitness industry?

Answer: Well, Jonathan, I’ve been in the fitness industry since 1980 when I became an aerobics instructor –– lol, with the leg warmers and all the crazy attire and back when you didn’t have to be certified. I was also an athlete growing up –– a track star mainly, running a 5:40 mile and great at all sports . Then in 1988 –– when I was about 26, I saw a photo of Rachel McClish (later I met her at Gold’s Gym Palm Desert, CA) and that inspired me to compete in bodybuilding. I won my first competition, Ms. San Luis Obispo 1989 (with 6.9% body fat) and placed in a few others. However, due to the fact that in the 90’s women in bodybuilding were getting bigger and were taking steroids I switched to fitness shows and I went on to place in the top-ten Ms. Fitness USA in 1990 and Ms. Fitness San Diego 1995 –– just to name a few. I was also a competitor on American Gladiators in 1990.



It was about that time that I decided to become and ACE Certified Fitness Trainer, training thousands of clients with a very, very high success rate. Ever since, I have continued my education in health and fitness with my main focus on nutrition as well as one of the most well-respected fitness organizations to date –– the C.H.E.K. Institute.

As a woman in my late forties –– almost 50 –– I can say that even though I competed at 5 to 9% body fat, with a frame size of a teenager, I still maintain around 12 to 16% body fat year round and between size 2 and 3. And that is after having children –– two of the most wonderful daughters on the planet!

Question: You refer to My Diva Diet as the last diet book a woman would need. What makes this diet so special?

Answer: First and foremost, My Diva Diet is based on sound nutrition and IT WORKS! It is not like many of the other diet programs that offer quick-fix solutions to a problem that requires a lifestyle change of proper diet and exercise. It is also tailored JUST for women. Since women have different body types, goals, energy requirements, and health and weight-loss concerns than our male counterparts, MY DIVA DIET’S fat-loss diet book provides a precise method for women (of all ages) to reach their health and fitness goals. Also, it is jammed packed with tons of information (in a user friendly format) so that women have all the tools they need to lose fat the safe, healthy and lasting way –– including a diet quiz, complete directions, workbook, special guides, tips and charts, meal options and recipes, restaurant eating guide and grocery shopping tips, and information about foods, reading labels, nutrition, exercise, body fat, calories and more.
Click here to read the entire interview and my thanks to World of Diets and Jonathan!

Nov 28, 2010

What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Seven: Sports Drinks and More

With so many pre-made beverages (sports and other types of drinks) on the market today, what should a "concerned dieter" do?

Opinion by Christine Lakatos — on Nov 27, 2010

Article first published as What You Drink Impacts Your Diet, Part Seven: Sports Drinks and More on Blogcritics.

Image for this feature Part of Fitness Flash on Blogcritics Magazine

Finally, we resume our "beverage expedition," discovering how liquid consumption can have a major impact on your diet –– both good and bad –– and whether you are on a mission to lose body fat and/or manage your health.

We have tackled a variety of liquids –– five to be exact, with four to go, first confirming that water is essential to life and critical for health and weight loss. Later we uncovered that coffee is good in moderation if you skip the cream and sugar; tea (without the sugar) offers countless health and wellness benefits, while green tea helps fight obesity and lower LDL (bad) cholesterol; milk is highly overrated; and consuming too much soda has dire consequences to your overall health and fitness level.


Now we take a brief look at sports and other drinks bombarding the fitness industry, like Gatorade, PowerAid, Glaceau Vitamin Water, Snapple, and many more. Interestingly, most of these drinks are labeled as "healthful," but in fact contain sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, crystalline fructose, and other sweeteners –– commonly used ingredients that we covered in Part Six, exposing their "perils." These drinks add empty calories to your diet and fat on your body; putting many on the fast track toward obesity. This includes powdered drinks like Kool-Aid as well as those cute little juice boxes, which will be addressed next in our beverage series. On the other hand, Crystal Light and other “no calorie, sugar-free, diet" powered drinks use artificial sweeteners like aspartame, saccharin, or Splenda –– another red flag when consumed in excess.

With so many pre-made beverages (sports and other types of drinks) on the market today, what should a "concerned dieter" do? First and foremost, don't believe the hype, even if sports drinks are "celebrity endorsed." After all, "stars" get paid millions of dollars for their so-called stamp of approval and the companies producing them are motivated by their bottom line –– money.

While the "foundation" of sports and other drinks is water, and some include added vitamins, minerals and fruit juice, the extra calories, sugar and additives may not be worth it in the long run. In reality, they are not always the best liquid choice, especially if you are trying to lose weight. However, if you are an athlete, participating in sports, lacking certain nutrients, trying to gain weight, or need the flavor in order to get liquid in our body, then by all means "knock back" your favorite sports drink or vitamin water –– in moderation.

The most important lesson at this juncture in our beverage expedition is that when it comes to pre-made beverages, make sure you read labels and educate yourself in the realm of "food and drink additives." Bottom line though, there is no legitimate substitute for just plain H20!

Our next stop will be juice –– both fruit and vegetable, with meal replacement drinks and alcohol to follow, where I will continue to guide you off of the "fat path" and on to the "fit path."

Sep 25, 2010

My Diva Diet: What the Experts are Saying!


Back in 2008 after we released My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book and Workbook, we have had the honor of experts reviewing our book. Even though we have a complete "EXPERT REVIEW" Section on our website, I wanted to share some of the highlights:

Tammy and Lyssie Lakatos The Nutrition Twins

My Diva Diet is jammed packed with so much wonderful information. It actually answers any nutrition / diet question you've ever had (and even those you never knew you had!). I loved all the fun tips, recipes, and the Diva Diet Quiz to help guide you in your own personal goals. I love that this works for each person's very own needs and there is even terrific advice for dining out and losing weight--something everyone needs!

I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to lose weight, get healthy or who just wants sound nutritional advice--you will find all the answers to your questions here! You won't be disappointed--My Diva Diet is awesome!!!

Ingo Logé Motivational Speaker, Author, Ocean Lover and Nutritional Life Coach

This is a great book about diet, supplements, portions, what are good foods to eat and why, exercise and general health. This very real “how to do it guide book and field manual” Is the last book you’ll ever need girls. If you want to make changes to your life but aren't sure where to start out, this is definitely the book for you. If you want a solid explanation why you should change, followed up with research, this book is for you. Christina has taken information about diet, exercise, foods, ineffective habits, and mental and physical health from many different sources, including her own personal experiences, and compiled it into this book. The book is easy to read and is also an excellent starting point for anyone interested in improving his or her quality of life.

I personally enjoyed the book and have recommended it to many of my female friends and clients. This book as something for everyone, especially the person looking for a starting point. If you are serious about making life style changes and want a solid explanation as to why you should or shouldn't change something in your life; get this book. The book is easy to read, but application of the topics will take time. Don't expect a magic band-aid. After all, this book it about life style changes and that takes time.


Dr. Johnnie Ham, MD, OBGYN

My Diva Diet has finally arrived! This is THE book for anyone truly interested in a healthy lifestyle and is looking for the tools to make it happen. Christine is sharing her secrets here, in a simple, easy-to-read, and just-plain-fun workbook, that if you follow, will be guaranteed to produce results. As an OBGYN, I am often asked about diet and exercise, and how to sort thru the plethora of diet-fad books and systems. This is the book that finally I am recommending to my patients, because she has been able to address physiology, nutrition, and lifelong habits that will work for every woman. And men, these secrets apply to us as well!! If you really want to impact your health, and the kind of future you want for yourself, this book is a must-read!

Dr. Harold D. Segal, M.D.Dr. Harold D. Segal, M.D.

The key to a healthy spine is good nutrition and exercise. MyDiva Diet presents an intelligent and easy way to lose weight and get your health back. I have found that many of spinal problems have their origin in poor posture, poor eating habits, and lack of proper body mechanics. My Diva Diet addresses these issues in a cogent and reasonable fashion. This book is in my waiting room and I highly recommend it to my patients and anyone interested in good health and fitness.

2008

Midwest Book Review
November 2008


Still another diet book? Well "My Diva Diet: A Women's Last Diet Book " is a diet book unlike you have ever seen before! Author and Certified Fitness Trainer Christine Lakatos, with the assistance of contributing author Amber Garman, along with help a team of folks that includes Brian Anderson, Scott Martin, Angelica Lakatos, Nicole Stuiber, Michelle Ahearn, Dan Port, Sean Troeger, and H. David Segal, M.D., bring to women a ground-breaking diet plan specifically designed to promote health, nutrition, weight loss, and a healthy lifestyle. This user-friendly, interactive instruction guide offers a workbook format providing quizzes, checklists, recipes, advice and tips -- but most importantly a plan designed for women of all ages for successfully losing and keeping off unwanted weight.

Click here to keep reading...

Best Diet For Me
BestDietForMe.com
November 2008


My Diva Diet was developed by Christine Lakatos, an ACE Certified Fitness Trainer and former professional bodybuilder. Lakatos' experience in the fitness industry, and especially her one-on-one experience with clients as a fitness trainer led her to develop the program. In her introduction to the program, she also incorporates an explanation of how her health philosophy for the program is rooted in her belief in Judeo-Christian principles. Designed for women, My Diva Diet illustrates the reasons why women gain body fat by using "fitness superheroes," Super Fit Diva and her dog, Paw, and a host of evil "diet villains," like "Tranny Granny", "Dr. Pill" "Mrs. Regret", "Vegg", and others, to illustrate who your true diet allies and enemies are. The author uses "Diva Quotes" to emphasize important principles, and food pyramids to provide nutritional guidelines for fat reduction and weight loss maintenance. The cute superheroes add an element of fun and help to motivate you as you work your way through the book.

Click here to continue...


2009
Health Bolt Book Review @ BlissTree.com
March 2009 By Liz Lewis

There’s no getting around it - diet really is a four letter word. It’s a word that frequently conjours up feelings of frustration, impatience, disappointment, sadness, and even failure.

Which is probably why Christine Lakatos describes her book My Diva Diet as "A Woman’s Last Diet Book". It’s a turn of phrase that’s guaranteed to attract those who are looking for an answer to all their dieting woes.

And it’s very likely it might just do just that. A 413 page workbook, resource, and motivational guide, My Diva Diet got my attention from the get go with it’s innovative characters. There’s Ms Diva who highlights all useful tips and her sidekick Paws, who summarizes the how-to information. Superheroes and Diet Villains also make an appearance to emphasize who the true diet allies and enemies are. If you‘re starting to think this is all sounding juvenile and too TV cartoon-ish, trust me it‘s not. There is so much information packed into this book, that it could easily become the only diet book I’ll ever need.

Click here to continue...

Book Review: My Diva Diet
Blogcritics Magazine
March 2009 by Allie James

There is a place for "thinking outside the box," especially when writing a diet book and trying to stand out from the thousands of competitive diet books available to the hungry market of "tired-of-dieting dieters." Christine Lakatos wrote My Diva Diet, and is such a thinker. She wants to get our attention, and she does so by using Diet Villains and Superheroes throughout her book. We have Super Fit Diva, who highlights for us some very useful tips, and it's her presence throughout the book that ties everything together. Her sidekick, Paws, makes a presence as well, and summarizes the howto information for us.

Click here to continue...


Book Review: My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book by Christine Lakatos Blogcritics Magazine
April 2009 by Lynda Lippin

Some readers of a certain age may remember body builder and author Christine Lakatos from the 1989 season of TV's American Gladiators. Now an author and personal trainer, Lakatos has produced an informative weight loss guide for women.

My Diva Diet tries to grab the reader's attention from the cover, which resembles a bright pink comic book with the Dieting Superhero Ms. Diva in the center (yes, she even has a sidekick lioness, Paw) and lots of bright headlines ("Expose & Defeat Your Diet Villains," "Lose Fat, Gain Health," and "Not a quick fix..."). The book is written in a cute, female-oriented voice and is a workbook with tons of quizzes, checklists, and graphics. At base, the program consists of a food program and exercise program for a weight loss phase and a maintenance phase.

Click here to continue...




Diet Blog...Eat Right. Get Healthy.
Book Review: My Diva Diet
July 2009 by Mike Howard

I don't know if I'm the best person to review a book that is "for Women only" although in reality, the fairer sex is the prime target for marketing of diet books/products.

Henceforth, I have toted this rather large pink-coloured book around with a certain degree of inconspicuousness - determined to unravel the secrets of "a women's last diet book".

Author Christine Lakatos takes the reader through a comprehensive plan to help us women achieve the health and body they want. And, when I say "comprehensive", I'm not spouting hyperbole. This book is enormous and chock full of guides, charts, worksheets, quizzes, recipes, and the like.

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Diet Choices
DietChoices.com

My Diva Diet Review July 2009

My Diva Diet is a very healthy diet for women designed by a former bodybuilder.

Background

Christine Lakatos' My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book is a diet book from an ACE Certified Fitness Trainer who is also a retired body builder. Lakatos has won several titles including Ms. Fitness San Diego 1993. This diet is designed just for woman and focuses exclusively on their needs. For those looking for a little "hand holding" on their diet, the My Diva Diet might be a good diet to choose. The diet is designed to be executed in two phases with the first phase being a ten week plan, and the second phase being one that transitions dieters to a healthy lifestyle. The plan calls for dieters to consume 1,200 to 1,300 calories per day during phase one of the diet. These calories should be 35% protein, followed by 45% fiber and 20% fat respectively. Fiber is to be consumed at every meal, and dieters should consume between four and five meals a day.

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Weight Loss Institute
My Diva Diet Review by Susan Brown
November 2009

Searching for the right type of diet might be a hard thing to do for us, women. Mostly nowadays, when there are hundreds of diet pills, fat burners, appetite suppressants and diet plans all over the internet and deciding which one worth trying out is even harder than the whole weight loss procedure. Getting the needed help would be necessary, finding a site; a helping hand which can really help us would be useful. Mydivadiet.com might give you the needed help and even more, all this in the best, lightest atmosphere, the site is giving us.

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EveryDiet.org
December 2009

Lakatos presents a lot of useful dietary information in a format that will be easy for most readers to absorb. Her program involves a clear system that is based on solid principles and is likely to produce successful results for most dieters.
# Pros Based on up to date scientific principles.
# Specifically meets the needs and goals of women.
# Focus is on a long-term solution rather than a quick fix approach.
# Illustrated format can help to maintain attention and highlight important points.
# Flexible approach with seven different ways to use the program.

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2010

The Flex Belt Nutrition Center
My Diva Diet Review Summary
May 2010

My Diva Diet is self hailed as a woman’s last diet book. The reason is that it is written and designed by a woman to address the specific needs of the seemingly lifelong weight challenge women face. The book explains that in America, at least, there is an epidemic with lack of self confidence relating to image and weight. A small percentage of women are reportedly unlocking the key inside them that allows them to break through perceived inadequacies, gaining mastery over their fears. Once this is accomplished, life health and fitness can become a priority, according to the author. Eating right, exercise and mental clarity all reportedly contribute significantly to how women can finally be free, lose weight and change their lives forever.

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Diets In Review
DietsInReview.com
August 2010


My Diva Diet
A women-only diet plan that leads to success.

My Diva Diet is a book that markets itself as a woman’s last diet book. The book is written by Christine Lakatos, a former profession body builder, and Amber Garman.

My Diva Diet presents a fun and entertaining way by using animated “fitness superheroes” and “diet villains”. The fat loss diet book includes “Diva Quotes,” “Paw Guides” and “Special Superhero Designs” (e.g., food pyramids for fat reduction and maintenance) to add fun and clarity to your journey of a better body and healthier, happier life.

It includes a diet quiz, worksheets, practical guides, special quotes tips and charts, as well as tasty, quick weight-loss meal plans and recipes, and much more.


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World of Diets
My Diva Diet Review
August 2010

The My Diva Diet creates a lot of anticipation. A diet book written by a retired body builder with several prestigious titles including Ms Fitness San Diego 1993 is going to deliver a mighty punch! Has author Christine Lakatos lived up to her promise of delivering a ‘Woman’s Last Diet Book’? Read on to find out.

Lakatos’ book builds on what she has learnt training female clients for fitness and weight loss. In the beginning of the book, she explains her simple philosophy for the diet program. According to her, women take their fitness and weight loss cues from the wrong people. This prevents them from attaining their weight loss goals. She illustrates using characters like ‘fitness superheroes’, ‘diet villains’ and so on. All along, the author provides effective ‘Diva quotes’ to drive home important principles and nutritional guidelines.

Click here to continue...

The Kosmix Community
Article about My Diva Diet
September 2010 by Michael


My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book is a weight-loss book authored by Christine Lakatos and Amber Garman. The book was released in 2008 by Publisher Services. Christine Lakatos has been in the fitness industry for over 29 years. She is a former Miss San Diego, Miss Fitness USA, and even a competitor in the American Gladiators television show.

Although My Diva Diet is written specifically for women of all ages, younger readers will probably enjoy the book the most. The book is filled with positive advice and entertaining activities. This is where the book shines: the authors know how to communicate their positive message of healthy nutrition to female readers.

Click here to continue...


These are excerpts from our Expert Review page. And, make sure to check out www.MyDivaDiet.com for our Real Life Diva Testimonials and to learn more about the destructive diet villains and much, much more.

Lastly, don't forget in November 2009, we released the My Diva Diet: Compact Version –– Sound Nutrition Made Practical and we are working on the exercise book –– Work It, Girl: Work the Fat Off and the Firm On! Plus, someday Super Fit Kids will be released as an animated TV series and video to educate, entertain and engage our children toward health and wellness!

STAY TUNED....

Sep 18, 2010

Outblush "My Diva Diet Road Test" Response


Over the summer, I was honored to find out that the girls at Outblush.com, Trajano and Janetor, decided to test my diet book, My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book and Workbook. After all, Outblush is a cool place for Fashion –– Home –– Beauty –– Life!



Diet Road Test: My Diva Diet
July 2010

Well, we survived going gluten free for three weeks, and took a break so we could enjoy the 4th of July and all the delicious foods that holiday brings. It's time to dive back in, though, and for the next 3 weeks, Trajano and Janetor will be following Christine Lakatos' My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book ($16) as closely as possible.

What is it? A former competitive bodybuilder and American Gladiator contestant, Christine Lakatos works as a fitness trainer in the San Diego, CA area. She advocates a diet based on sound nutritional principles - lean protein & dairy, complex carbs, whole fruits & veggies - and smaller meals throughout the day, totaling 1200-1300 calories daily. Her emphasis is on "pure" foods, i.e. natural, organic, and kosher-certified, in order to minimize exposure to toxins and environmental pollutants. And, yes, kosher means no pork products & no shellfish.


Does it work? According to reviewers, yes. There are no strange supplements or drinks recommended, and certainly eating mostly lean fish, chicken & turkey, veggies, fruits, lean dairy and whole grains will contribute to your overall health. As one might expect from a bodybuilder, she is a strong advocate for exercise, as well.


What's with the quizzes and cartoon characters? The book is peppered with Christine's cartoon alter ego, Crystal, and her panther sidekick, Paw. They pop up regularly with tips & tricks, and "battle" some pretty corny Diet Villains, like Al and Cole (alcohol), Tranny Granny (trans fats), and the Junkster (junk food). To assess your eating & exercise habits, you take a 13-page quiz on everything from how often you work out to how many glasses of wine you consume each week. She also includes plenty of recipes and food tracking worksheets.


What do we think, as non-fitness freaks? Both of us work out regularly, so that won't be a hardship. Lakatos' recommendation to stick to kosher-certified organic meats is a little hard to swallow, though: We concede her point that kosher-raised animals are less likely to have been mistreated and have been fed a healthier diet, but not everyone has easy access (or the grocery budget) to a kosher butcher. We will, however, try to stick to organic products as much as possible. Consuming just 1200-1300 calories a day will be tough, as will giving up desserts and Janetor's personal weakness, Diet Coke. Lakatos does allow for "cheats," like Fudgsicles or dark chocolate, but only "once per week or less."


Be sure to check back in with us for the next three weeks, as we'll be posting Tuesday updates on how we're doing with the Diet Road Test: My Diva Diet!





MY RESPONSE:

In their intro,
they had some nice things to say about my background, but I don't live in San Diego. Yes, I was a AG contestant –– see clip above. However, the wonderful girls at Outblush had already labeled my "Superhero Theme" as corny. Alrighty then! It appeals to some and some NOT, however, there is a method to my madness. The short-term strategy is this: love the idea or hate it, it is the only diet book with this type of format and one that will be remembered. According to another "reviewer" of my book, Alie James writer for Blogcritics Magazine...
There is a place for "thinking outside the box," especially when writing a diet book and trying to stand out from the thousands of competitive diet books available to the hungry market of “tired-of-dieting dieters.” Christine Lakatos wrote My Diva Diet, and is such a thinker. She wants to get our attention, and she does so by using Diet Villains and Superheroes throughout her book. We have Ms. Diva, who highlights for us some very useful tips, and it's her presence throughout the book that ties everything together. Her sidekick, Paws, makes a presence as well, and summarizes the howto information for us.

Secondly, the long-term strategy is to turn my Superhero Theme into an animated TV series, video game, etc. –– in an effort to entertain, educate and engage children toward health and wellness. After all, childhood obesity is on the rise and I wrote about a while ago...

Childhood obesity is real and unfortunately on the rise. According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, "childhood obesity has more than tripled in the past 30 years." What is even more alarming are the health consequences: "Obese youth are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure." They are also at greater risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, bone and joint problems, and other health issues. Let’s not kid ourselves; other areas are affected when children are overweight or obese; energy levels, mood, and yes, self esteem. Sadly, "obese youth are more likely than youth of normal weight to become overweight or obese adults."
But the format of the book can be subjective and I appreciate the girls at Outblush and their honesty. The other issue they had with my diet book makes much more sense because it had to do with the Kosher aspect. I must admit that I've had few reviewers question or comment my "sanity." And if I had write it again, I would have been more thorough in my explanation. That is why I released the My Diva Diet: Compact Version. Here is my responses the them..
As far as the Kosher meats, you are right, it is difficult to get at the grocery store, however, you can find it at Trader Joe's. At any rate, in the Compact Version, due to confusion and quite a bit of people calling me "crazy," I changed it to "animal friendly meat." It is all about how the animals are treated and most "authentic" organic meat producers do a pretty good job.



Week Two of the girls at Oublush My Diva Diet Road Test is where they outline the good, the not so good, the ugly, and the beautiful.

Diet Road Test: My Diva Diet - Week 2
The Good: My Diva Diet would be a great book for women who don't know much about nutrition and have never really needed to lose weight before - perhaps you're anxious about baby weight, or just finished college and your adolescent super-metabolism is starting to grow up and slow down. There is a wealth of useful, applicable nutritional knowledge in the book. We particularly liked a lot of her recipes - they encourage you to incorporate more beans and legumes into your diet, which are both tasty and great for you, as well as experiment with a wide (and delicious!) variety of herbs and spices.

The Not So Good: Going through the book can feel a bit choppy - there are pop-outs, tips, tricks, highlights, FYIs, notes, and reminders galore. There's no easy narrative to follow and the layout can be a bit confusing and off putting. The diet lacks a clear starting point - the book's cover boasts that there are 7 ways to use the program, but singling out the one that's right for you is no easy task. Perhaps the My Diva Diet Compact Version ($10) is a better option, neither Trajano nor Janetor have tried it out, but perhaps it's a more user-friendly guide to the Diva Diet.

The Ugly: There are two Phases in the book - Diva Reduction and Diva Maintenance. Diva Reduction suggests eating between 1200 and 1300 calories a day, which most nutritionists suggest is the required baseline caloric consumption for survival. If you've been eating 2000+ calories/day for years and in the course of a few days cut your intake almost in half it would cause quite a shock to your system and leave you feeling starving and deprived (which usually leads to 3:30 cookie binges). She does say that a woman who exercises vigorously may require up to 2,000 calories a day, but for all the useful diet info in the book, there's no chart or guide that factors in height, age, weight, and activity level to help you find a healthy caloric intake range for your body type. The nutritional needs of a 43 year-old woman who is 5'10" and wants to lose 15 pounds are very different from those of a 5'6" 19 year-old who needs to drop 50.

The Beautiful: It's clear that Lakatos wants My Diva Diet to be sustainable for women of all ages and walks of life. She is encouraging and enthusiastic in every possible way, and her belief that all woman can lose the weight they don't want and live healthier lives is indeed inspiring. The "Society Guide" towards the end of the book is a wonderful section that focuses on the different lives that women lead, from housewives and single moms to teens and college girls. Lakatos outlines ways to eat healthy and make time for physical fitness that are reasonable for each individual lifestyle. And you can't beat her overall message - there's no fast, easy way to lose weight, but the right way is well worth it.
MY RESPONSE:
Again the user-friendliness, the overall format, and cartoon aspects can be subjective, however, the caloric intake is not. And there are not many women that are consuming 2000 calories a day. Kudos to them if they are eating 2000 cals a day and are fit as ever. I certainly don't, but did when I was competing.


Here are just a few notes on the subject.

  1. On page 33 of the book, I give "Caloric Intake Guide" very specifically to deal with different women and their existing eating habits.
  • If you are 2,000 cals per day you may only need to drop to 1400 to 1600.
  • If you are eating under 1000 cals per day, may need to slowly build your daily caloric intake up.
  • If you exercise regularly or you are an athlete, you many need more than 1300 cals per day; even if you are trying to lose fat.
  1. Stated throughout the book is that 1300 is just a baseline to get women in the "caloric ballpark" and that they can adjust daily caloric intake at any time in the program.
  2. I also state in the book that is better to "clean up your calories before you reduce them."
  3. Outlined on page 32 is a guide telling the readers that they can move on the Phase 2 at any time, which calls for higher calories of 1400 to 1600 per day and more if applicable.
  4. Furthermore, if when prescribing 1300 calories per day, it is RARE that people will follow that number EXACTLY. In reality, most will eat a few hundred calories more than that. This is due to inaccurate measuring or not measuring at all, as wells as eating a late night snack and not counting "cheat calories."
  5. Pages 97 through 140 is an entire section on the longest of the Five Factors Affecting Body Fat and Health –– Factor #4 Quantity and Distribution of Calories –– again laying out daily caloric intake from 1200 up to 3000 with many details. This should calculated according to BMR, lean body mass, age, activity level, and weight management goals (page 99). While other things should be considered like medical conditions, pregnancy, and youth. Moreover, whether or not a women is interested in losing fat, gaining muscle, or maintaining their current condition, should be calculated into the equation. Also, if a women is coming off of a restricted or starvation diet plan is critical because if she went right to the high caloric range, she would blow up like a balloon.
  6. In fact there is an entire chapter devoted to calories, "Calories: Friends or Foes?" found in PART SEVEN pages 285 to 292.
Bottom line on daily caloric intake: Maybe they missed those parts, but there is more. Week Three of the My Diva Diet Road Test:

Diet Road Test: My Diva Diet, Week 3
We're rounding the bend into the final week of following Christine Lakatos' My Diva Diet ($16), (check out our intro and first week observations), and it's been an interesting road. Here are our thoughts and observations from our second full week of this Diet Road Test.

Layout: While the information given is mostly nutritionally sound, i.e. lean proteins, veggies, and whole grains, the book's layout remains the most frustrating aspect for us both. Most diet books are split into introduction, methodology, how-to-follow instructions, tips, recipes, and encouragement. This one is all over the map, and doesn't reference many actual nutritional guidelines until the "References" section at the end.

WHY Should I Eat This Way?:
We would have preferred more scientific reasons for the guidelines presented, i.e. why it's important to drink water all day or to avoid gluten. The "Because Paw Said So" attitude gets a little... scold-y and preachy after awhile, as do the cartoons. With all the "eat this, not that!" advertisements and books out there, we want to know the scientific reasons WHY soda is bad, or why shellfish and pork are verboten.

Seven Ways? Where? How? The cover, as we mentioned before, claims that there are seven ways to use this diet, but they're not clearly outlined. a strongly defined starting point and plans for each of the seven ways to use My Diva Diet (as you'd get with, say, the South Beach Diet introduction book) would be very helpful.

1200-1300 Calories A Day? Seriously? Again, the lack of scientific evidence behind this diet rears its head here. The American Heart Association's bare minimum for a 19-30 year old woman with a sedentary lifestyle to maintain their current weight is 2000, and for a woman 31-50, it's 1800. If you're active, that number goes up. Of course, if you're trying to lose weight, cutting calories and increasing activity is the way to go, but not to such drastic levels. We both tried to stick to the 1200-1300 calorie limits, which she recommends for moderately active women, and were both starving, which lead to evening dessert binges.

However, It's Not All Bad: As we mentioned before, we appreciate the paws-itive (ha) attitude of the My Diva Diet, which is a refreshing change from the doom-n-gloom tone of many other diet & nutrition books. Lakatos and her team truly want women to be healthy and happy for life, and emphasize that this should be the last "diet" you'll ever need, simply because it isn't a fad diet, but rather a lifestyle. Still, we'd like more science and less cartoons.

Hmm. Again, I appreciate the candor, however, since I already addressed the daily caloric intake, I will say this, I doubt the American Heart Association knows how to get women down to 10% body fat. And did these girls lose any weight? They never said.

Additionally, the book is over 400 pages long and full of scientific data and 20-pages of references. In fact, PART FOUR dissects each of the Five Factors and the 32-subcategories to educate the reader. PART SEVEN –– Valuable Information –– includes an entire section called "Nutrition 101" and on page 313, why pork and shell fish are not all that healthy or fit, are addressed.

I could go on and on....Click here to see Table of Contents.

Seven Ways to Use My Diva Diet -- www.MyDivaDiet.com
  1. Follow the entire fat loss program strictly for 6 weeks or more for a major transformation in body fat and health.
  2. Follow the entire fat loss program semi-strictly for just a few weeks to lose weight and improve your health.
  3. Follow 50 to 70% of the entire fat loss program for any time frame to make progress with your body fat and health.
  4. Fix just one of the Five Factors Affecting Body Fat and Health to lose weight and improve your health.
  5. Read the through the workbook portion to learn better ways of eating, effective exercise, and much more.
  6. Use the workbook as a guide to teach your children healthy ways of eating so they won’t fall victim to the deception of the Diet Villains.
  7. Use any portion of My Diva Diet's fat loss diet book as a tool to prevent obesity and poor health.
At the end of the "Outblush Road Test," IT'S ALL GOOD and I'm grateful –– my thanks to Outblush! For now, signing off as Super Fit Diva and PAW --
"We are in a battle for our fitness and health, and in any battle we should know our enemies! Together we can stop the confusion and expose, attack, and defeat the Diet Villains. You can help Paw and I conquer these malicious villains in your life and the lives of others!"

Sep 15, 2010

The Kosmix Community Weighs in on MY DIVA DIET!


Kosmix Community, My Diva Diet Overview
Author: Michael

My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book is a weight-loss book authored by Christine Lakatos and Amber Garman. The book was released in 2008 by Publisher Services. Christine Lakatos has been in the fitness industry for over 29 years. She is a former Miss San Diego, Miss Fitness USA, and even a competitor in the American Gladiators television show.

Although My Diva Diet is written specifically for women of all ages, younger readers will probably enjoy the book the most. The book is filled with positive advice and

My Diva Diet: A Woman's Last Diet Book is a weight-loss book authored by Christine Lakatos and Amber Garman. The book was released in 2008 by Publisher Services. Christine Lakatos has been in the fitness industry for over 29 years. She is a former Miss San Diego, Miss Fitness USA, and even a competitor in the American Gladiators television show.

Although My Diva Diet is written specifically for women of all ages, younger readers will probably enjoy the book the most. The book is filled with positive advice and entertaining activities. This is where the book shines: the authors know how to communicate their positive message of healthy nutrition to female readers.

My Diva Diet advocates fiber intake in every meal. Protein and carbohydrates should be the main nutrients in every meal, but the caloric intake should not be above 1300 per day. In addition to healthy foods (mostly fruits and dark green vegetables), My Diva Diet recommends drinking plenty of water and herbal teas.

For some women, 1300 calories per day may seem low, but that's only at the beginning. As women lose weight, they can increase their caloric intake up to 2000 calories per day in later phases of the program. There is a strong focus to reducing body fat for healthy living in My Diva Diet. To this extent, the plan stresses the benefits of light cardiovascular activities during both phases of the program; as the well as the introduction of strength training in the second phase.



One small correction: exercise is recommended in BOTH phases of My Diva Diet. It is Factor #5: The Six Components to an Effective Exercise Program:







MY DIVA DIET –– The only diet book to bring you "Fitness Superheroes" and "diet villains"! www.MyDivaDiet.com





Thanks for taking notice Michael @ Kosmix Community
Check out Kosmix Company Profile here.

Aug 26, 2010

World of Diets Weighs in on My Diva Diet!

world of diets A Diet Review Encyclopedia


The My Diva Diet creates a lot of anticipation. A diet book written by a retired body builder with several prestigious titles including Ms Fitness San Diego 1993 is going to deliver a mighty punch! Has author Christine Lakatos lived up to her promise of delivering a ‘Woman’s Last Diet Book’? Read on to find out.

Lakatos’ book builds on what she has learnt training female clients for fitness and weight loss. In the beginning of the book, she explains her simple philosophy for the diet program. According to her, women take their fitness and weight loss cues from the wrong people. This prevents them from attaining their weight loss goals. She illustrates using characters like ‘fitness superheroes’, ‘diet villains’ and so on. All along, the author provides effective ‘Diva quotes’ to drive home important principles and nutritional guidelines.

According to Lakatos, women must follow these guidelines to lose weight and become healthy:
  1. Adequate liquid consumption
  2. Appropriate quantity and distribution of calories
  3. High quality of calories to be taken in
  4. Balanced food intake
  5. Exercise
The diet is divided into 2 phases. The first phase is the reduction phase which lasts for 3-10 weeks. At this time, dieters must consume between 1,200 to 1,300 calories a day. 35% of these calories must be derived from protein, 45% from carbohydrates and 20% fat. Fiber must be had with every meal. Desserts are to be avoided.

The second phase is the maintenance phase, where dieters are allowed to consume 1400-1600 calories daily. Of these, 20-35% may be from protein, 45-65% from carbs and 20-30% from fat.

In both phases, women who are highly active may adjust their calories upwards.

Dieters may take in 5 small meals a day. All processed foods must be avoided. Natural and organic foods are recommended. The author also stipulates that all food taken in must be kosher.

The My Diva Diet plan allows a cheat meal after the first 2 weeks of phase 1. A cheat sheet mentions acceptable foods and serving sizes. In the maintenance phase too, cheating is allowed once a week although dieters may cheat once or twice every month in addition to this.

Not surprisingly, exercise is an important part of the diet plan. Recommended exercises include cardiovascular conditioning, strength training, balance training, corrective exercises and functional training.

My Diva Diet: A Review

This diet plan is exclusively for women. It is based on a number of healthy principles and the author asks followers to alter their lifestyle so that they can become healthy and slim.

Pros:
  • Healthy eating based on scientific principles
  • Not a quick-fix approach
  • Contains a maintenance phase
  • 7 different ways are suggested to follow the program
  • Provides clear guidelines for portion control
  • Includes recipes and menu plans
  • Also throws light on the psychological factors of weight loss
  • Comes straight from the mouth of an expert

Cons:
  • Diet plan is for women only.
  • Fairly restrictive
  • Recommends the intake of foods that are kosher so it may not appeal to non-Jewish readers.
  • Dieters may have difficulty eating out during Phase 1.

In Conclusion

The My Diva Diet is an excellent diet plan that focuses on all the right things. However, some parts of it may seem a little impractical, like eating organic foods. If dieters are willing to overlook these rather small issues, they can benefit from a great diet plan.

MY NOTES:
World of Diets does a great job of reviewing my diet book and fits right in with our other Expert Reviews. Thanks to them and let me explain the "kosher" thing...

I advocate "kosher meats" due to the fact that these animals are free of disease and are slaughtered more humanely –– thus it makes for a healthier food choice and a "fitter" conscience. Pork is not recommended due to it toxicity. And being selective with seafood is due to the fact that some pass pollutants to humans.

For those of you who are not "hip" to the kosher part of my book, you may like the My Diva Diet: Compact Version, where I use the term "animal friendly." www.MyDivaDiet.com